Policing Under Trump, the “Ferguson Effect,” and More

Audio Transcript

Brian Anderson: Since the fatal shooting of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri, in August 2014, there has been an ongoing public debate about the American criminal justice system.  Critics including former President Barack Obama and his Justice Department, the activists of Black Lives Matter, and many in the elite press charge the policing is shot through with racism, specifically that young blacks, young black males in particular, are routinely being harassed, harmed, and even killed by the police with near impunity.  And as a corollary that blacks are unjustly being imprisoned at rates disproportionate to their numbers.  President Donald Trump’s promise to restore law and order in American cities was a centerpiece of his campaign last year and many of his opponents said he was exaggerating the safety problem in the inner city and thereby race-baiting and demonizing minorities.  But with an undeniable increase in homicides in shootings in cities across the county since 2014, it seems that Trump was right to raise the issue.  The antipolice narrative, our guest Heather Mac Donald has argued, has led officers in high-crime areas to start to disengage from proactive policing, leading to more violent crime.  That phenomenon has come to be called the Ferguson effect, a term Heather popularized with a much-discussed Wall Street Journal editorial.  We will talk with Heather about the state of policing, the facts about crime, James Comey, and her recent encounters with campus protestors that put her in national headlines.

Welcome back to 10 Blocks, I am your host Brian Anderson.  Joining us on the show today is Heather Mac Donald.  She is a longtime contributing editor of City Journal, the Thomas Smith Fellow at the Manhattan Institute, and author of the New York Times’s bestseller The War on Cops, which will be out in an updated paperback edition this fall.  Her latest essay, How Trump…

Read the full article from the Source…

Back to Top